Anglicans promise drought relief

Anglicans promise drought relief

Desire Ncube recently in LUSAKA, Zambia
Anglican Diocese of Manicaland’s Bishop Eric Ruwona last week said the Church had started mobilising resources to combat the devastating effects of drought brought by the El Nino climate phenomenon.
President Mugabe has declared the agricultural season a state of national disaster El Nino — a phenomenon characterised by seasonal warming over the Pacific Ocean causing extreme heat conditions in Southern Africa — hit the summer crop planted in 2015.
On the sidelines of the Anglican Consultative Council in Lusaka, Zambia last week, Bishop Ruwona said there was need for Africans to find solutions to their problems, and the Anglican Church in Zimbabwe would use local resources to help the needy.
He said the Church had shifted from looking to international donors for help after realising they had the capacity to bail themselves out. “We are mobilising our churches — all over the country — from areas that are better resourced to donate so that we can supply to the affected areas. Currently we are not targeting any particular area, but I can safely say that we have already sold the idea to our people and the response is overwhelming,” Bishop Ruwona said.
He said for Manicaland, areas like Nyanga, Nyamaropa, Mutasa were their priorities.
The Mutare Cathedral, Bishop Ruwona, said had mobilised resources for the drought-stricken Dora community near Dangamvura.
The Anglican Church’s five dioceses in Zimbabwe — Harare, Bulawayo, Masvingo, Manicaland and Central Zimbabwe — had resolved to mobilise food aid, he said.
On the ACC meeting, Bishop Ruwona said: “This meeting is a once in a life time, especially for us Africans as we host 165 countries representing over 85 million Anglicans in the world … it’s quite a privilege.
“The ACC-16 standing committee is discussing the effects of the changing environment and issues of drought will top discussions.”
He said the Anglican Church in Zimbabwe had initiated programmes on peace building, healing and reconciliation.
“This is the only way we believe that we will reconcile with our brothers and sisters who we did not agree with us during times of conflict.
“And I am pleased to say the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby is also going to address that issue during his visit to Zimbabwe.”

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