Service for pre and post-marital investigation

Service for pre and post-marital investigation

Tendai Mbirimi

Matrimonial Investigations Legal Advisory (MILA), a local association of legal experts and private investigators who offer legal advice in matters to do with matrimonial forensic accounting, recently introduced a cheaters’ tracking service, which aims to promote matrimonial discipline.

MILA services fall into two categories: pre-marital and post-marital investigations. The infidelity surveillance programme tracks down and unmasks cheats.

Irrespective of distance, a betrayal is a betrayal — even if it happens thousands of kilometres away from the matrimonial home.

Of late, many couples have been worried about sexual immorality, yet there are many other areas like financial, social and criminal records that need clarity in a relationship.

Some people lie about owning companies and properties, while others are fugitives on the run.

MILA’s tracking services can be instigated at the request and authority of one party but unbeknown to the target.

“Pre-matrimonial enquiry assists individuals not yet married to have a detailed report concerning the family, age, address, education, nature, habits, character and reputation, past history, assets, financial background, social background, medical history or other required details of the person.

“We can go as far as tracking the subject back to his or her country of origin,” said Prosper Tsamwai, a criminologist and member of the MILA committee.

“Nowadays some people are engaging in inter-relational unions with people from other countries, which therefore makes it a priority for either spouse to instigate a pre-matrimonial investigation of each other. It is always better to be informed about the alliance now than landing in marital pitfalls which could have been avoided,” said Tsamwai.

A post-matrimonial investigation involves a married partner who wants to ascertain if his/her partner is involved in an extramarital affair, or if he/she has children or properties hidden somewhere.

“If one suspects his or her partner of cheating what he/she requires is not hearsay evidence but solid proof. We at MILA keep a close watch on the subject and gather evidence so as to help you in the family court, or assist you to have proof which can help you to make a decision from an informed point of view,” said Tsamwai.

Research has shown that cheating does not necessarily mean the cheat thinks their relationship is an absolute failure.

While that is not to suggest that everyone who cheats feels this way, the majority of those who commit adultery are happy in their lives and relationships and are not even looking for a break up.

According to a Rutgers University study, 56 percent of men who had affairs were happy with their partners, while 34 percent of women who cheated were also really content in their relationship.

Whether MILAs initiative will help to solidify marital bliss or influence more divorce cases will be told by time.

 

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