Muslims reach out to the community

Veronica Gwaze
THE Harare Muslim community will today conclude their two-day cleaning and maintenance programme at Granville Cemetery which is part of their social responsibility programme.

This is an activity of remembrance and honour to their departed fellow Muslims.

“For us, burning grass, waste and weeds is a sign of disrespect. Instead of burning we bring hoes and other equipment so that we can thoroughly clean (tHe cemetery),” said Imam Ustaaz Saleem.

The Muslim community annually initiates clean-up programmes at the Old Tafara Cemetery and this year, they are extending the service to Granville Cemetery.

“We clean our own place because in most cemeteries we are allocated our own burial place. So as appreciation, it is our responsibility as a Muslim community to clean our space,” he said.

In addition, he said the Qur’aan affirms visiting graves as mustahab (recommended) and mandoob (desirable) as it refreshes one’s soul and helps to evoke supreme feelings in them while strengthening one’s relation with their past, religious culture and history.

The Muslim community engages in several other activities both within and outside their faith.

Tomorrow, they will be sharing food with the community at Old Tafara Mosque.

Over the years, Muslims have been involved in social responsibility programmes that include food distribution targeted at the elderly and the vulnerable.

Some of their partners include the Islamic Gift of the Givers and the International Islamic Relief Organisation, among other agents.

Earlier this year, the International Islamic Relief Organisation of Saudi Arabia (IIROSA) partnered with Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals (Sekuru Kaguvi Eye Hospital) for free cataract operations.

More than 500 patients with eye cataract benefited from the free services.

In partnership with the Diabetic Association of Zimbabwe, the programme has also catered for diabetic individuals free of charge.

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