Interest rates of selected Sadc countries

GRAPHZimbabwe
The benchmark interest rate in Zimbabwe was last recorded at 14.11 percent. Interest rate in Zimbabwe is reported by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe. Interest rate in Zimbabwe averaged 13.39 percent from 2011 until 2014, reaching an all-time high of 16.04 percent in March of 2012 and a record low of 9.50 percent in February of 2011.

The Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe does not have an official discount rate. The official interest rate is the Weighted Lending Rate. The Weighted Lending Rate is the sum of minimum nominal lending rates weighted by individual bank’s loan book sizes and published by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe.

South Africa
At its March 27, 2014 meeting, South African Reserve Bank left the benchmark interest rate unchanged at 5.5 percent, as growth outlook remains subdued while inflation risks are on the upside. The central bank hinted possible rate hikes in the medium run.

Zambia
The benchmark interest rate in Zambia was last recorded at 12 percent. Interest rate in Zambia is reported by the Bank of Zambia.

Mozambique
At its April 16, 2014 meeting, Bank of Mozambique left its benchmark interest rate unchanged at 8.25 percent for the sixth consecutive meeting, saying this was consistent with meeting domestic economic targets for 2014.

Botswana
The benchmark interest rate in Botswana was last recorded at 7.50 percent. Interest rate in Botswana is reported by the Bank of Botswana.

Malawi
The benchmark interest rate in Malawi was last recorded at 25 percent. Interest rate in Malawi is reported by the Reserve Bank of Malawi. —www.tradingeconomics.com

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  • Ethan

    The reality on the ground, though, is that interest rates charged by the banks are actually in the upwards of 30%, with penalty rates of as high as 50%. This, mind you, is on US$! The relatively high interest rates in Zimbabwe compared to other countries in the region is one of the reasons why our cost of production is also relatively high, which is one of the reasons why we will continue to import more than we export and worsen the country’s liquidity crisis!.