After the tears, Majoni heads to Bolton

Don Makanyanga
THIS time last year Moline Majoni felt like wheeling away from racing after she had failed to secure a visa to compete in the Boston half-marathon.
“I was told that my visa had been delayed so there was no way I could travel and make the race.

It was really disappointing and I felt like quitting,” said the four-time Zimbabwe Sportswoman with a Disability Award winner.

However, after further introspection Majoni dried her tears and now she is smiling again: she is heading to Bolton in May and the mother of two, who was diagnosed with poliomyelitis (polio) when she was two, is keen to make her mark.

“I am glad I made the decision to push on with wheelchair racing because heading to Bolton is going to be one of the major highlights of my career.

“My wish is to raise the country’s flag high and bring back a medal,” said the 35-year-old.

Sport has been Majoni’s salvation.

“In 2008 I met this woman in Mbare who told me about wheelchair basketball but I quickly brushed off the idea because I was never interested in sport.

“However, one day I visited Richwood Sports Club in Harare and saw several people who were disabled but were enjoying playing sport.

“I decided to take up basketball and later on I ventured into wheelchair racing. Sport has made me enjoy life and feel confident about myself,” she said.

Last weekend Majoni won gold in the Soweto-Stellenbosch Oteniqua Wheelchair Challenge in South Africa, but feels she could have put daylight between herself and the chasing pack with a better wheelchair.

“People were surprised with how I raced using the old wheelchair I have. One can only imagine how fast I can go with a new wheelchair.

“One of my prayers as I prepare for the Bolton race is a new wheelchair,” she said.

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